Astute Methods Of Osce For Consultant Broken Down

<img src="http://i.imgur.com/tDFFKYW.jpg" width='250px' alt='Women hide their faces during a police raid of a suspected brothel in Almaty. It is not a crime to sell sex for money in Kazakhstan. However, there are administrative and criminal penalties for activities related to prostitution, such as soliciting or offering sexual services in public areas, operating a bordello, or engaging in the trafficking of persons for the purpose of sexual exploitation. (Photo: Almaty City go to my blog Department of Internal Affairs)’ align=’left’ /> The idea has gained modest support from one womens advocacy organization, the Feminist League of Kazakhstan, but the groups representatives have nonetheless expressed skepticism that legalization would generate a bonanza of revenue for the state. The group contends that the number of prostitutes in Kazakhstan is comparatively low, thus, if taxed, the amount collected by the government would not be able to plug many budgetary gaps. Data on the number of sex workers in Kazakhstan is hard to come by. Estimates in recent years have not been made public: the Ministry of Interior does compile such statistics, but the information is classified and for internal use only. In 2011, officials said there were 4,000 prostitutes working in the country. Unofficial sources, however, said the actual number could be double the government estimate. Some critics worry that legalization would present the wrong image of Kazakhstan to the outside world, and turn the country into an undesired sex-tourism destination. It is not a crime to sell sex for money in Kazakhstan. However, there are administrative and criminal penalties for activities related to prostitution, such as soliciting or offering sexual services in public areas, operating a bordello, or engaging in the trafficking of persons for the purpose of sexual exploitation. While authorities have condemned prostitution, they have not been able to back their words with deeds. Several years ago, an Interior Ministry-sponsored measure to ban prostitution and impose criminal penalties on those who buy sexual services failed to gain traction.

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After winning April’s Code for Hillary hackathon in San Francisco, the winning team made up of David Capelli, left, Rocio Lopez, second from left, “If Bernie had won the nomination, his team would have pushed beyond what Obama did in 2012,” Harris said. Clinton’s campaign, he added, is just too insular to do that. Carla Mays, a San Francisco-based technology consultant, said she got a taste of the campaign’s coolness to outsiders after her team won April’s “Code for Hillary” medical assistant interview no experience hackathon with a proposed app to help voters stuck in long lines at polling stations. “To win the hackathon and then be ignored like that,” Mays said. “It was like, ‘What the hell?’ ” In response, Clinton campaign officials said that the hackathon’s purpose was to give tech volunteers a space to meet and collaborate, not necessarily to produce a finished product. Stephanie Hannon, who left Google to become Clinton’s chief technology officer, said she has not been ignoring local talent. The campaign, she added in a prepared statement, has been “harnessing the passion of our grass-roots supporters in Silicon Valley to build tools and products that’ll help Hillary win in November.” Asked about any innovations the campaign has spearheaded, Clinton spokesman Tyrone Gayle pointed to articles about the campaign tweaking its webpage to encourage supporters to store their credit card data and creating a mobile app that lets supporters win virtual prizes for completing tasks such as sending out pro-Clinton videos to their Facebook friends. Delany said Clinton’s technology is incrementally building on Obama’s 2012 campaign, just as that effort built on Obama’s first basics presidential campaign. Volunteer-driven technology can make for good headlines, Delany said, but Obama’s core technology was formed by its campaign and its main vendors. “Anytime you can tap volunteer enthusiasm, it’s good,” Delany said. “But anyone who has worked on open source projects knows how difficult it can be to keep volunteers on task.” Catherine Bracy, who ran Obama’s San Francisco volunteer technology office four years ago, agreed.

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